Community Radio Station Meeting

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There will be a meeting at 7:00 PM on Wednesday April 12 in Silver City to continue local efforts to get a community radio station up and running in Silver and vicinity.

There has been a lot of progress in these regards over the last several months, and if you are interested in coming to this meeting to see what is going on, or joining in the efforts, please call 534-0298 to get directions to the meeting place. You can also email BayouSeco@aol.com for directions.

MRAC Folk Series: Tracy Grammer & Jim Henry

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TRACY GRAMMER & JIM HENRY
Friday, April 7, 7:30pm

Tickets: $15 Members, $18 Non-members.

“When Dad used to get out his lap steel and electric guitars, we’d invite the neighborhood kids over and sing country songs. I’d sit across from my dad and read the music upside-down so I could turn the pages for him. I developed an ear for harmony early on and hardly ever sang the melody,” she muses, “and it drove my little brother crazy.”

Flower of Avalon” is her first full-length album since her musical partner Dave Carter died suddenly in July 2002, and the #1 most played album on folk radio in 2005, show-casing her outstanding voice, guitar, and fiddle.

Performing with Tracey is Jim Henry, long-time collaborator, playing acoustic guitar, electric guitar, dobro, mandolin and vocals.

www.tracygrammer.com
Sponsored by Wells Fargo Home Mortgage – Neysa Pritikin.

Water Plan Public Meeting

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For those of you interested in Silver City’s water future, the Town of Silver City Utilities Department will be having a public meeting to discuss the update to the town’s 40-year water plan on Thursday, March 30 at 7:00 pm at the Grant Co. Administration Building, 1400 Hwy.180 East.
Dave Romero from Balleau Groundwater Inc. will make a presentation on their report “SUPPLEMENT ON WATER USE AND WELLFIELD SERVICE –TOWN OF SILVER CITY WATER PLAN” and answer questions.
You can download a copy of the report on the town’s webpage at www.townofsilvercity.org . The conclusions and recommendations from the report are included below.
Thanks,
Allyson Siwik, Executive Director
Gila Resources Information Project
305A North Cooper St.
Silver City, NM 88061
505.538.8078
— ————————
CONCLUSIONS
1. The Town of Silver City wellfield is capable of producing water to supply the high growth rate of 2.9 percent per year for about the next 30 years. After this time, an alternative source of water, well deepening or replacement wells would be necessary to maintain that high growth rate after a 40-year planning period.
2. The Town of Silver City wellfield is capable of producing water to supply a medium growth rate of 1.45 percent per year for the next 40 years.
3. Future water demand for the Town of Silver City is uncertain, but for planning purposes, high and low growth rates (2.9 and 1.2 percent) account for the demand required to supply all connections to the Town water system, while recognizing trends of service area expansion and population change that have been observed in the past.
\n
4. Town of Silver City groundwater diversions have averaged about\n2,800 acre feet per year in the last five years. High and low\nestimates of growth in water demand indicate a range of time (within\nthe next 16 to 38 years) in which future water demand exceeds the\nTown’s permitted use of 4,566.64 acre feet per year. \n
\n
5. With regard to wellfield interference, potential replacement\nwells for the Anderson and Gabby Hayes wells are preferable to a new\nContinental well located between the existing Frank’s and Woodward\nwellfields. \n
\n
6. Imported water would provide a new water source to the Town of\nSilver City municipal water system and would extend the life of the\nGila Group aquifer stored resource. \n
\n
7. There is an estimated 15,900 acre feet per year of groundwater\nflowing through the Mangas and Mimbres subbasins of the study area. In\nthe long term, the Town of Silver City wellfield as presently\nconfigured can sustain a yield of 4,200 acre feet per year. Configured\nat a 300-foot deeper pumping water level, the wellfield can sustain\n6,600 acre feet per year. The long-term yield of other users in the\nMangas and Mimbres subbasins has an effect on the sustainable yield of\nthe Town wellfield. \n
\n
\n
\n
RECOMMENDATIONS \n
\n
1. Consider the option of developing groundwater versus an\nalternative source to supply demand above the current permitted use of\n4,566.64 acre feet per year. If groundwater development is preferable,\nthen begin a water rights acquisition program that involves seeking\npotential rights for transfer into the Town water system. Considering\nthe timeline and uncertain outcome associated with acquisition of\nwater rights in New Mexico, it is reasonable to begin the acquisition\nprogram within a 40-year planning period. \n
\n
2. Prepare to deepen the wellfields in future years to extend the\nservice lifetime to meet required levels of demand. \n
\n
3. Planned wells should be constructed, developed and maintained\nto maximize efficiency. Incorporate a plan of field testing for\nwellfield expansion or replacement wells so that observed field\nconditions and as-built well conditions can be applied to wellfield\nsimulations.",1] ); //-->
4. Town of Silver City groundwater diversions have averaged about 2,800 acre feet per year in the last five years. High and low estimates of growth in water demand indicate a range of time (within the next 16 to 38 years) in which future water demand exceeds the Town’s permitted use of 4,566.64 acre feet per year.
5. With regard to wellfield interference, potential replacement wells for the Anderson and Gabby Hayes wells are preferable to a new Continental well located between the existing Frank’s and Woodward wellfields.
6. Imported water would provide a new water source to the Town of Silver City municipal water system and would extend the life of the Gila Group aquifer stored resource.
7. There is an estimated 15,900 acre feet per year of groundwater flowing through the Mangas and Mimbres subbasins of the study area. In the long term, the Town of Silver City wellfield as presently configured can sustain a yield of 4,200 acre feet per year. Configured at a 300-foot deeper pumping water level, the wellfield can sustain 6,600 acre feet per year. The long-term yield of other users in the Mangas and Mimbres subbasins has an effect on the sustainable yield of the Town wellfield.
RECOMMENDATIONS
1. Consider the option of developing groundwater versus an alternative source to supply demand above the current permitted use of 4,566.64 acre feet per year. If groundwater development is preferable, then begin a water rights acquisition program that involves seeking potential rights for transfer into the Town water system. Considering the timeline and uncertain outcome associated with acquisition of water rights in New Mexico, it is reasonable to begin the acquisition program within a 40-year planning period.
2. Prepare to deepen the wellfields in future years to extend the service lifetime to meet required levels of demand.
3. Planned wells should be constructed, developed and maintained to maximize efficiency. Incorporate a plan of field testing for wellfield expansion or replacement wells so that observed field conditions and as-built well conditions can be applied to wellfield simulations.
\n
4. Identify wellfield capture zones so that areas that contribute\nwater to the wellfield can be part of a wellhead protection\nprogram.
\n
\n
5. Track adjacent wellfield withdrawals to intervene with\nlarge-scale changes that could impact the Town sources.
\n\n\n
",0] ); D(["ce"]); //-->
4. Identify wellfield capture zones so that areas that contribute water to the wellfield can be part of a wellhead protection program.
5. Track adjacent wellfield withdrawals to intervene with large-scale changes that could impact the Town sources.

Film Society: Paradise Now

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The WNMU-Silver City International Film Soceity will host “Paradise Now” at the Real West Cinema II on March 19. Show time is 4 p.m.

Two Palestinian childhood friends have been recruited for a strike on Tel Aviv. The movie focuses on their last days together. When they are iintercepted at the Israeli border and separated from their handlers, a young woman discovers their plan and causes them to reconsider their actions.

Official web site: www.paradisenowthemovie.com

SC Food Coop: Creating a Local, Sustainable Food System for Our Community

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The Silver City Food Coop is beginning a series of forums…

The topic of this first forum, to be held on Thursday, March 16th at 7 PM, is:

Creating a Local, Sustainable Food System for Our Community.

The forum will be held at Alotta Gelatto, 619 N. Bullard, Silver City.

Local and Regional Food Systems
What is a local food system and why is it important?

Local food is about having the right to know where your food came from, who produced it and how, and the chance to buy food that supports your local community and reflects your values. It’s about re-weaving a complex web of connections – social, economic, ecological, and political in nature – that are being torn asunder by our global food system.

Introduction:
Have you ever bitten into a garden-fresh tomato and experienced an incredible burst of flavor? Do you get that same burst of flavor when you bite into a perfectly round and red tomato from the supermarket? Chances are, your answers are “yes” and “no.” There’s a reason for that.

Most food at the supermarket was picked days, weeks or even months ago, and shipped hundreds or even thousands of miles. The produce varieties were selected for their appearance or to their ability to withstand being stored or shipped-not necessarily for good flavor or nutritional value. So a Chandler strawberry, very sweet but with a short shelf life, is probably never going to make it into your supermarket, nor will a ripe, succulent peach or a just-picked snowpea.

How far did your food travel? On the average, about 1,500 miles from farm to fork. It is “elderly, well-traveled produce,” in the words of nutritionist Joan Gussow. And it is increasingly likely to travel all the way from Chile, Mexico, New Zealand or Guatemala, as a global food system imports produce from all over the world. Many items are now available 24/7, year-round.

How can we know when tomatoes or peaches are in season when we can get them throughout the year? Does it really matter?

Locally grown food, if properly handled, is likely to be fresher and therefore more nutritious. It protects the environment by avoiding the massive energy use and pollution involved in long-distance shipping. And buying locally produced goods also gives an important boost to the local economy as dollars circulate to other businesses in the area. It helps build community and “social capital,” or a set of relationships that make communities more resilient and livable, especially when you buy directly from the farmer or producer.

Keeping local agriculture viable also helps build local and regional food security. Local production is less vulnerable to disruption of the transportation system by natural disasters or sabotage. It is typically more responsive to the needs of the community, given the personal connections that develop between producers and consumers. For lower-income communities, community control is an especially important issue, partly because the conventional supermarket industry has largely abandoned poorer neighborhoods.

Local food is about much more than just season and place, and it doesn’t mean having to give up oranges, bananas and coffee. It’s knowing where your food came from, who produced it and how. Buying food grown closer to home is not a quaint throwback to an agrarian age. It is a powerful tool for transforming our economy away from a race to the bottom in environmental and health standards, and toward an economy that is based on principles of democracy, community, health and sustain-ability.
——
These events are coordinated by the Member Linkage Committee (MLC) of the SCFC’s Board of Directors. Each forum will be proceeded by and consist of an open meeting of the MLC and a facilitated discussion of a more global issue. The MLC meeting will begin at 6 PM and is open to all interested people. For more info contact Martha Egnal at marthaegnal@yahoo.com or 313-3691.

Dr. Magdaleno Manzanares on the “Growing Latino Influence on American Politics.”

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Magdaleno Manzanares, associate professor of political science at Western New Mexico University, will discuss the “Growing Latino Influence on American Politics” on Wednesday, March 15, as part of the Grant County Democratic Party’s “Issue Lunch” series.

Manzanarez, whose instruction includes American national government, Latin American history and politics, Latino/Chicano politics and international social justice issues, was born in Southern Mexico. He received his first degree from Santa Rosa Junior College in California, and a bachelor of arts in international relations from the Universidad de las Americas in Puebla, Mexico.

He went on to obtain a master’s degree in political science from Sonoma State University in California, and completed his doctoral work at Northern Arizona University. The dissertation for his Ph.D. was on contemporary political changes in Mexico.

Manzanarez has published several articles on the Northern American Free Trade Agreement, and a book titled “NAFTA and Neocolonialism” in 2004. At the February 2005 conference of the American Academy of Behavioral and Social Sciences, he presented a paper “The Execution Dilemma: Foreigners on Death Row in the United States.”

WNMU students chose Manzanarez as Educator of the Year in 2000, 2001 and 2002. He serves as advisor to the MEChA club and the Society for Education in Politics, which participates in an annual model United Nations conference. He is also the local coordinator of the American Democracy Project, a national program that aims to increase civic participation among college students. Many of his former students are now pursuing careers in public service. Manzanarez is vice-president of the WNMU faculty senate, and serves on the board of Hidalgo Medical Services.

Manzanarez is the third speaker in the “Issues Lunch” series:

“Although Latinos, Hispanos and Chicanos are by no means a monolithic block of voters – and have different issues in different communities and geographic areas – their presence in the economic and electoral arenas has a great impact on the American political debate,” he said.

Where: The Red Barn Steakhouse (buffet lunch, includes one trip to the salad bar plus beverage, for $8).

When: March 19 at 11:30. Discussion starts at 12:10